Institut de Recherche en Informatique Fondamentale

IRIF Université Paris 7 CNRS L'IRIF est une unité mixe de recherche (UMR 8243) du CNRS et de l'Université Paris-Diderot, issue de la fusion des deux UMR LIAFA et PPS au 1er janvier 2016.

Ses objectifs scientifiques se déclinent selon trois grandes thématiques au cœur de l'informatique : les fondements mathématiques de l’informatique ; les modèles de calcul et de preuves ; la modélisation, les algorithmes et la conception de systèmes.


Poste de maître de conférences


Un poste de maître de conférences est ouvert au concours 2017, affecté à l'IRIF, sur les thématiques de l'unité. Consulter la fiche de poste.


Prochains séminaires


Lundi 20 février 2017 · 11h00 · Salle 1007

Vérification · Loig Jezequel (L2SN - Nantes) · Lazy Reachability Analysis in Distributed Systems

We address the problem of reachability in distributed systems, modelled as networks of finite automata and propose and prove a new algorithm to solve it efficiently in many cases. This algorithm allows to decompose the reachability objective among the components, and proceeds by constructing partial products by lazily adding new components when required. It thus constructs more and more precise over-approximations of the complete product. This permits early termination in many cases, in particular when the objective is not reachable, which often is an unfavorable case in reachability analysis. We have implemented this algorithm in a first prototype and provide some very encouraging experimental results.

Mardi 21 février 2017 · 11h00 · Salle 1007

Algorithmes et complexité · Zvi Lotker · Literature Networks and Time in Social Networks.

In this talk I will describe the connection between social networks and theater plays. I will show how algorithms can analyze plays using social networks, and how plays can reveal an interesting algorithmic problem.

Mercredi 22 février 2017 · 11h00 · Salle 3052

Séminaire des doctorants · Lucas Boczkowski (Algorithms and complexity Group) · Minimizing Message Size in Stochastic Communication Patterns: Fast Self-Stabilizing Protocols with 3 bits

The talk is based on a paper whose abstract is the following:

This paper considers the basic PULL model of communication, in which in each round, each agent extracts information from few randomly chosen agents. We seek to identify the smallest amount of information revealed in each interaction (message size) that nevertheless allows for efficient and robust computations of fundamental information dissemination tasks. We focus on the Majority Bit Dissemination problem that considers a population of n agents, with a designated subset of source agents. Each source agent holds an input bit and each agent holds an output bit. The goal is to let all agents converge their output bits on the most frequent input bit of the sources (the majority bit). Note that the particular case of a single source agent corresponds to the classical problem of Broadcast (also termed Rumor Spreading). We concentrate on the severe fault-tolerant context of self-stabilization, in which a correct configuration must be reached eventually, despite all agents starting the execution with arbitrary initial states. In particular, the specification of who is a source and what is its initial input bit may be set by an adversary.

We first design a general compiler which can essentially transform any self-stabilizing algorithm with a certain property (called “the bitwise-independence property”) that uses l-bits messages to one that uses only (log l)-bits messages, while paying only a small penalty in the running time. By applying this compiler recursively we then obtain a self-stabilizing Clock Synchronization protocol, in which agents synchronize their clocks modulo some given integer T, within O(log n log T) rounds w.h.p., and using messages that contain 3 bits only. We then employ the new Clock Synchronization tool to obtain a self-stabilizing majority broadcast protocol which converges in O(log n) time, w.h.p., on every initial configuration, provided that the ratio of sources supporting the minority opinion is bounded away from half. Moreover, this protocol also uses only 3 bits per interaction.

Based on joint work with A. Korman and E. Natale.


Vendredi 24 février 2017 · 14h30 · Salle 3052

Automates · Daniela Petrisan (IRIF) · TBA


Vendredi 24 février 2017 · 14h00 · Salle 1007

Catégories supérieures, polygraphes et homotopie · Cyrille Chenavier · Caractérisation et construction de bases de Gröbner par les opérateurs de réduction



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